Instruments

The Organs

The Aeolian-Skinner, Opus 1438

The primary organ used for weekly worship at St. Luke’s is the 69-rank Aeolian-Skinner.

Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Opus 1438, was built by the Aeolian-Skinner Organ Company, Inc. of Boston, Massachusetts, in 1965 for installation in Caruth Auditorium of the Owen Fine Arts Center at Southern Methodist University. A gift to the university from C.S. and Bernice Hamilton of Dallas, for twenty-seven years, the instrument at SMU served as one of the outstanding teaching and concert organs in the South. The organ was re-installed at St. Luke’s in 1992 by Range Organ Company of Dallas.

Under the instruction of Dr. Robert T. Anderson, many of North Texas’ finest organists became accomplished artists at the console. International concert organists who performed on Opus 1438 at SMU were Robert T. Anderson, Marie-Claire Alain, Guy Bovet, Maurice Duruflé, Marie-Madeleine Duruflé-Chevalier, Anton Heiller, André Marchal, Luigi Ferdinando Tagliavini, and Gillian Weir.

In consultation with Dr. Anderson, the organ’s original specification was determined by Roy Perry of the Aeolian-Skinner staff and the pipe scales and tonal concept were developed by Joseph S. Whiteford, Chairman of the Board of Aeolian-Skinner. The finishing of the organ was by Donald Gillett, Head Finisher, and Roy Perry. The SMU installation was by J.C. Williams of New Orleans.

The organ consists of four divisions (Great, Swell, Positiv and Pedal) comprising 69 ranks and 51 independent stops. The design of the organ incorporates several features necessary to the rendition of the vast literature of the instrument. The organ follows basically the North German ideals of the late-17th and early-18th centuries. A “plenum” is achieved within the structure of the three manual divisions and pedal. The ideal of complete choruses on all manuals and pedal is often neglected in contemporary organ building. Certain “Romantic” voices are incorporated in the Swell Organ to increase the versatility of the instrument.

Since the action of the organ is electro-pneumatic, the console can be placed apart from the instrument, giving the performer a better perspective. The console is constructed of teak, rosewood and ebony. One of the most notable visual features is the Swell Division, placed in an exquisite enclosure of warm, rich teak wood.

The William Longmore, Opus 2

For services held in the All Saints Chapel, St. Luke’s also has the 9-rank, 2 manual tracker by William Longmore.  More information about William Longmore and this instrument can be found here.

Other Instruments

St. Luke’s is blessed to have many other instruments to worship God. The children’s area uses many rhythm and Orff style instruments. Pianos are located in the chapel, rehearsal hall, children’s choir room, and the sanctuary, which holds the 7’6″ Yamaha Grand. The church also uses three octaves of Malmark handbells and five octaves of Malmark Choirchimes.